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Little cat saves hand from falling out of a window
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(via lookingferocious)

Source: dovga.net
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Jeter comes up to bat and stands there for some time listening to the entire crowd scream “DEREK *clap clap clap* JETER *clap clap clap*”…he even gets applause from the opposing National League Pitcher

and then, among all the noise, the folks watching from home can hear this one person in the stadium saying “OVER *clap clap clap* RATED *clap clap clap*”

at the EXACT same moment, Jeter hits the pitch and makes it to second base…Take that hater!

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explainers-nysci:

Animal Madness

“Every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose hold of it,” said Dr. Braitman, author of the book entitled Animal Madness. Her book chronicles the stories of a few interesting characters in the animal kingdom. Anxious dogs, compulsive parrots, elephants in recovery and a panic ridden gorilla are just a few of the cases that Braitman discusses in her book.

From NYSCI’s own Wild Minds exhibit, we know that some animals can think. We know that that thinking can lead to the creation of tools and the solving of problems. We know that thinking animals participate in organized play, that they have the ability to communicate and that many of them are quite self-aware. As any pet owner or animal lover can testify, animals have complex minds and are rather emotional.

Many dogs who serve in war zones come home with PTSD-like symptoms similar to their human colleagues. Some other animals compulsively lick their tails like the repetitive hand washing of a person with O.C.D. And still others engage in behaviors like plucking out feathers or refusing to eat, not too different from those who struggle with self-mutilation and eating disorders.

The entire premise of Dr. Braitman’s book suggests humans are not the only ones who battle mental illness, but studying animals who have similar symptoms may help us understand ourselves!

Source: New York Times 

Source: explainers-nysci
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explainers-nysci:

PAC-mecium

Classic 8-bit games like Pac-Man, Super Mario Brothers and Tetris were well know for their electrically synthesized music and their basic graphics. Bioengineer, Ingmar Reidel-Kruse, at Stanford University has found a way to combine those nostalgic games with his study of microbiology. 
PAC-mecium is his take on Pac-Man. In the original game, the Pac-Man avatar must eat pellets and escape from ghosts. In Riedel-Kruse’s version, microbes called paramecia are the avatars, and they must run away from the huge hungry fish that swims through the game. 
You’re probably wondering how tiny microbes can serve as an avatar for a videogame when you can’t even see them with the naked eye. The key is in the device rigged by Riedel Kruse. It’s a chamber that has a glass bottom which emits electrodes, has a webcam, and a magnification lens. Turns out, when there is a change in the electrical field, the paramecium swim toward the electricity. The webcam and the magnification lens on the chamber work together to produce an enlarged image of the paramecium. 
The two specks in the bottom left corner of the image above are magnified microbes. Their image is being overlain onto the 8-bit game graphic. Using a remote control to guide the chamber, the paramecia follow the charge through the game. As they swim over the graphic of a yellow or blue pellet they “eat” the pellets for points, and swim for their lives to escape the 8-bit fish! 
Source: Popular Science

explainers-nysci:

PAC-mecium

Classic 8-bit games like Pac-Man, Super Mario Brothers and Tetris were well know for their electrically synthesized music and their basic graphics. Bioengineer, Ingmar Reidel-Kruse, at Stanford University has found a way to combine those nostalgic games with his study of microbiology.

PAC-mecium is his take on Pac-Man. In the original game, the Pac-Man avatar must eat pellets and escape from ghosts. In Riedel-Kruse’s version, microbes called paramecia are the avatars, and they must run away from the huge hungry fish that swims through the game.

You’re probably wondering how tiny microbes can serve as an avatar for a videogame when you can’t even see them with the naked eye. The key is in the device rigged by Riedel Kruse. It’s a chamber that has a glass bottom which emits electrodes, has a webcam, and a magnification lens. Turns out, when there is a change in the electrical field, the paramecium swim toward the electricity. The webcam and the magnification lens on the chamber work together to produce an enlarged image of the paramecium.

The two specks in the bottom left corner of the image above are magnified microbes. Their image is being overlain onto the 8-bit game graphic. Using a remote control to guide the chamber, the paramecia follow the charge through the game. As they swim over the graphic of a yellow or blue pellet they “eat” the pellets for points, and swim for their lives to escape the 8-bit fish!

Source: Popular Science

Source: explainers-nysci
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Knock knock.
Turin, Italy. July 6, 2014 x

For you two sweet-dispositionxo and lookingferocious

(via tongue-like-candy)

Source: haroldmadness
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could the food have been in cooler packaging?!?! i think not!!!

love the Yankee Pinstripes

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headed to tonight’s Yankee game!!! woot!!!!

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comaniddy:

explainers-nysci:

SuperPlanetCrash is planetary sandbox, so to speak.  It’s a solar system simulator posing as a fun computer game.  The simulator found here, challenges you to build your own solar system, and keep it stable!  

To do so, you must carefully place planets, ice giants, dwarf stars and various other celestial bodies within the system.  They all orbit around the large central star, but gravity’s pull definitely changes things.  Larger bodies like dwarf stars and giant planets have huge pull, and bodies the size of our Earth can easily get thrown off of their course.

Surrounding the central star is a habitable zone, usually determined by a temperature that can keep water in a liquid state.  Bonus points are awarded for the sheer number of planets that you can keep stable in that zone.  Point values are also affected by the “crowdedness level,” meaning that placing bodies closer together and risking planetary crashes, can earn you more points.  The ultimate goal is to create a stable system that survives for 500 years.

That is when the game ends, but win or lose, SuperPlanetCrash is a great conversation starter.  It gets you thinking, and talking about everything from gravity to eclipses. This hands on exploration of our universe and how it’s parts interact with one another would make a great teaching tool at NYSCI’s own Celestial Bodies exhibit in Mathematica!  Even if you’ve got the tiniest inner nerd, you should check out this game.

Source: Science News

GIF: comaniddy via Gigazine

This game is ASTRONOMICAL!
You should definitely check it out.

Source: explainers-nysci
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pretty cool Star Wars section at the Disney Store!

the Chewbacca notebook and the lightsaber pen really caught my eye