Photo Set

comaniddy:

All About That Bass (Science Parody)

Join me as we parody Meghan Trainor’s hit song ‘All About That Bass.’

This SciTune is about things like the grand scale of the universe, accepting Pluto’s as a dwarf planet, knowing that we are all made of star stuff, and more.

It’s like the Cosmos meets Pop Music.

[Watch The Video]

(via explainers-nysci)

Source: youtube.com
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we-r-not-tour-guides:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!!
What’s Ada Lovelace Day you ask? It’s a worldwide celebration of the achievements of women in STEM. Who was Ada Lovelace? In short, the world’s first computer programmer!
Find out more about her and the celebration here!

we-r-not-tour-guides:

Happy Ada Lovelace Day!!

What’s Ada Lovelace Day you ask? It’s a worldwide celebration of the achievements of women in STEM. Who was Ada Lovelace? In short, the world’s first computer programmer!

Find out more about her and the celebration here!

(via explainers-nysci)

Source: we-r-not-tour-guides
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Does Cancer Have a Sweet Tooth?

To most people, October is national candy month, but it’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month too!

Cancer cells are well known for growing at a rate that is out of control. It’s been an issue since 3000 B.C. when Ancient Egyptians recorded 8 cases of tumors or ulcers of the breast that were removed, but still there was believed to be no treatment for the disease.

We have definitely come a long way from the Egyptian style trauma surgery, but cancer still affects millions of people today. Cancer has put such a fear into the hearts and minds of our society that we’ve come up with some pretty crazy prevention techniques that may not be doing anything at all!

Myths like living near power lines, wearing deodorant or even drinking coffee are just a few of the absurd precautions some people take to avoid the growth of cancerous cells. Another common misconception says that cancer cells feed on sugar, and that consuming sugar or even artificial sweeteners can increase chances of developing cancer.

This however is not true. In fact, every cell in the human body, including cancer cells need blood sugar, but there is no research that suggests eliminating sugar completely will stave off cancer. Artificial sweeteners are found in everything, from candy to yogurt to salad dressing, and you may be consuming them with out even knowing it. That’s not to say that artificial sweeteners are good for you, but eliminating all sugar or sugar substitutes from a cancer patient’s diet would harm healthy cells that need energy to function.

To uncover more myths, urban legends, and old wives’ tales surrounding what causes breast cancer, visit Health Magazine.

Other Sources: 

American Cancer Society and Cancer Treatment Centers for America

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science-junkie:

The Strange and Radical New World of 3-D Printed Body Parts

A few years ago, if a horrific infection ate your jawbone, doctors had to build makeshift mandibles from your fibula, a process that left you sliced open as surgeons painstakingly whittled away at replacement bone. Yech.

Today they can just hit Control-P: Based on MRI and CT scans of your busted-up body parts, hyperspecialized 3-D printers produce custom replacements, no sculpture skills required. 

Read more (via WIRED)

Source: Wired
Photo Set

explainers-nysci:

Scientific Skele-Gro

Broken bones heal pretty well on their own. The only thing doctors really have to do is set the two pieces in line to ensure the bones grow back at the right angle. But certain injuries or defects leave too wide of a gap for new bone cells to fill in.

At Hogwarts, injuries like these would require Skele-Gro, the magical potion from the Harry Potter universe that’s known for it’s dreadful taste, and it’s ability to regrow “vanished or lost” bones. To regrow bones in the real world, our best technique been bone grafting. This process involves taking bone from a different part of the patient’s body and using it to fill in the gap.

This method doesn’t always work. Grafts don’t allow us to fit the complex shapes that bones come in, and sometimes the grafts don’t take. It’s still waiting on FDA approval, but thankfully, the newest method to regrow bone doesn’t involve a potion of any kind.

This idea relies on a biodegradable sponge seeded with human bone cells. Once the memory foam is formed into the proper size and shape, it is fit into the gap. It serves as a scaffold for the healthy bone to grow, but disappears once it’s replaced by solid bone.

It’s years away, but this biodegradable sponge could be a huge boost for reconstructive surgery.

Source: Gizmodo 

Source: explainers-nysci
Photo Set

explainers-nysci:

Disney Drone Parade

Drones make some people think of military and surveillance activities. And others wait for the day when drones will deliver our Amazon packages or our pizza order. But Disneyworld hasn’t been at the top of the “Cool Things Drones Can Do” list, until now.

Disney theme parks are well known for their rides, their friendly characters, the castle and their parades. The awesome displays of color and music and dancing require many stagehands, but this past month, Disney filed for three patents to use unmanned aerial vehicles in their parks. UVAs, more commonly known as drones, will completely revolutionize the park experience.

With UVAs, Disney Parks will have the ability to project images on drone lifted screens high in the sky. There are also plans to create giant sized parade puppets, manned solely by an army of drones (pictured above). And yet another patent suggests that Disney is working on virtual fireworks for their daily nighttime shows, saving lots of cost, and our planet!

The Federal Aviation Administration hasn’t approved drones for commercial uses yet, so it might be years before we have to say goodbye to the smell of firework bi-products.

Source: Discovery News

 

Source: explainers-nysci
Chat
  • me: *waiting for the E train*
  • MTA: jk they're not running tonight
  • me: *takes long hallway back to 7 train, travels to Queens, transfers to F train*
  • MTA: not so fast...we're only going one stop then kicking everyone off the train
  • me: *gives up on the subway, goes upstairs for buses. Rides two buses, arrives home and then posts about it on tumblr*
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sweat-and-smiles:

long-distance-runnerr:

nezua:

motivation-station123:

bodydiy:

How to tie shoes for running

Wait I need this for my dystonia!!!!

seems like valuable info to pass along

I would have threw out 115$ shoes if I didn’t use the Toe problem one. God bless this post.

I use the heel slipping one and it actually works.

but how do i lace em if i’ve got more than one of those problems? :(

(via lunarorbiter)

Source: rei.com
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we-r-not-tour-guides:

The big 5-0!
On September 9th, 1964… the Hall of Science was officially opened as an attraction for the 1964-65 World’s Fair and a permanent museum thereafter. 50 years later it’s still a go-to place for families, a resource for students and teachers, a career development center for youth, and an all around fun place!
Way to go NYSCI! Keep going strong!

we-r-not-tour-guides:

The big 5-0!

On September 9th, 1964… the Hall of Science was officially opened as an attraction for the 1964-65 World’s Fair and a permanent museum thereafter. 50 years later it’s still a go-to place for families, a resource for students and teachers, a career development center for youth, and an all around fun place!

Way to go NYSCI! Keep going strong!

(via explainers-nysci)

Source: we-r-not-tour-guides
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Here at NYSCI, we’re pretty familiar with the parts found inside the eye, and we have all gotten our fair share of questions that could have been saved for the optometrist.  Have you ever wondered about those weird worm-like specks that drift into your vision, then keep reading.

Those squiggly lines usually show up when you look at something really bright like the blue sky, or a white piece of paper. Those guys are called floaters, and they’re actually just shadows. As the cow’s eye dissection can attest, there is a glob of jelly-like goo that fills up the interior of the eye called the vitreous humor. This is where the floaters are located.

The purpose of the vitreous humor is to help the eye to stay round, and to keep the retina flat against the back of the eye. When light focuses through the different parts of the eye like the cornea and the lens, it must also pass through that gel to get to the retina. The floaters, that form when proteins in the vitreous clump together, often get in the way of the light that is projected onto the retina. Once the light is blocked, a shadow will be cast, resulting in the cobweb-like bits we see.

We all have ‘em, but only about 70% of people actually pay attention to the floaters in their eyes. They’re always there, but your brain tends to ignore them because it’s gotten used to them. Y our brain is pretty good at seeing around the floaters, the same way it ignores the way your nose blocks your vision. It’s very rare, but there are some severe cases of eye floaties that require the vitreous humor to be extracted and then replaced with saline liquid.

Source: IFLScience